Category Archives: Treatments

Groundbreaking Subcutaneous Implantable Defibrillator Expands Options, Improves Quality of Care for Pediatric Patients

Cardiac electrophysiologists have been placing implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for many years, with the standard system using a transvenous device. Although small, the device required physicians to implant directly into the heart and used leads with limited durability. Several years ago, subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillators (S-ICDs) were introduced, but the first generation S-ICD was largely restricted to adult patients, due to its size and the lack of remote monitoring capability. A newer, smaller model of the device was released in summer 2015, allowing pediatric electrophysiologists at Penn State Children’s Hospital to implant this device in children.

Image of male chest with EMBLEM (TM) S-ICD device implanted.

EMBLEM TM S-ICD device.

This second-generation device is smaller and thinner, projected to last 40 percent longer than the previous version and is enabled for remote patient monitoring. It eliminates many of the potential complications associated with transvenous leads and has demonstrated excellent real-world results, including low complication rates and high conversion efficacy.1,2 “The smaller size and remote monitoring capability of the second-generation S-ICD have made it more compatible for our patient population, and we do not have to implant anything directly into the heart,” says Jason R. Imundo, MD, pediatric cardiologist and electrophysiologist, Penn State Children’s Heart Group. Instead, the device is implanted just under the skin near the ribs. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Patient Care, Treatments

Innovative Solution to Treat Portal Vein Hypertension

The Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) procedure has long been used to treat portal vein hypertension in patients with cirrhosis and other conditions, prior to liver transplant surgery, however, it could not be used in those with a complete portal vein occlusion. 1 The transsplenic approach allows interventional radiologists (IRs) to bypass the liver.1 Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center is one of a few teaching hospitals in Pennsylvania to offer this innovative approach.

In the transsplenic approach, clinicians use a splenic sheath and lasso snare, transverse the spleen and continue the procedure using X-ray, achieving end-to-end anastomosis, which allows for balloon angioplasty in the blocked vein and facilitates completion of the TIPS. Portal veins are patent and anatomically normal nearly 80 percent of the time when imaged months later. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Treatments

Chemoembolization and Radioembolization for Difficult Liver Tumors; Choice May Depend on Blood Flow

Two-thirds of primary liver cancer patients and 90 percent of secondary liver cancer patients have inoperable tumors that are unresponsive to systemic chemotherapy and may benefit from transarterial chemoembolization or radioembolization with yttrium-90 (Y-90), both minimally-invasive, palliative procedures. Although research shows transarterial chemoembolization and Y-90 are usually equivalent treatments for most intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs)1, Heart and Vascular Institute considers tumor blood supply when deciding which therapy would be most beneficial for a specific patient.

Image on the left: Pre-chemoembolization axial, contrast-enhanced CT scan at the level of the liver. Image on the right: Post-chemoembolization axial, contrast-enhanced CT scan at the same level as the previous image.

Image on the left: Pre-chemoembolization axial, contrast-enhanced CT scan at the level of the liver. White arrow shows a hypervascular lesion (33.8 mm x 31.6 mm) in segment 7 of the liver consistent with hepatocellular carcinoma.
Image on the right: Post-chemoembolization axial, contrast-enhanced CT scan at the same level as the previous image. White arrows show the treated lesion (22.4 mm x 24.0 mm) in segment 7. The lesion is no longer enhancing and has decreased in size.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Patient Care, Treatments

WATCHMAN™ Device: Innovative Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Growing Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Population

By the year 2050, it is estimated that nearly 16 million people could suffer from atrial fibrillation (AF), but not all will tolerate long-term anticoagulant therapy.1 The WATCHMAN™ Left Atrial Appendage Closure (LAAC) device, the latest minimally invasive option at the Heart and Vascular Institute, can help bridge this clinical gap. In March, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center became the first in the region to implant the WATCHMAN device in non-valvular AF patients at increased risk for stroke and systemic embolism seeking an alternative to long-term warfarin therapy.

WATCHMAN<sup>TM</sup> device

WATCHMAN™ is delivered via a transfemoral approach and is designed to close the left atrial appendage (LAA) to prevent migration of blood clots, thus reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism. Images provided courtesy of Boston Scientific.© 2016 Boston Scientific Corporation or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Patient Care, Treatments

Total Artificial Heart: More Options for Those in Need of Smaller Heart, Destination Therapy

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center has joined two multicenter trials that evaluate a total artificial heart (TAH) and may save the lives of even more patients with irreversible biventricular heart failure (BVHF). The focus of the observational studies is the SynCardia® TAH, which was first approved by the FDA as a bridge to transplant in a 70cc size, based on a study of 81 patients, 79 percent of whom survived to receive a transplant.1

Image of SynCardia® TAHThe first study examines the safety of the 70cc device for use as destination therapy in patients with life-threatening BVHF who are ineligible for cardiac transplant. To date, 12 centers, including Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, are set to enroll patients and follow them for six months to confirm the device’s benefits. Researchers define success as survival to six months without permanent deficits from stroke. Patients may also participate in a secondary arm of the trial to determine whether a broader patient population would also benefit from the device.2 Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Patient Care, Research, Treatments

Team-based Approach to Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) Optimizes Recovery Post-Cardiac Arrest

Penn State Hershey Medical Center Life LionFor patients in cardiac arrest, every second counts, and targeted temperature management (TTM), or therapeutic hypothermia (TH), can prevent further damage. At Penn State Hershey, TTM protocol begins in the field, as the mobile intensive care unit, Life Lion, is empowered to initiate this neuroprotective therapy to unresponsive patients with vital signs. Upon arrival at the Medical Center, cooling to a targeted temperature of 32 to 36 degrees Celsius is continued via leg and torso wraps that are connected to a core cooling/warming pump device that travels with the patient to the cardiac catheterization lab and to the cardiac critical care unit. This temperature range is new, and recently has changed based on the most current research. TTM has been shown to improve neurological outcomes in patients following sudden cardiac arrest with return of spontaneous circulation (SCA-ROSC).1 A cerebral performance category (CPC) scale is used to measure cognitive recovery. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Patient Care, Treatments

New Subspecialty of Adult Congenital Heart Disease Now Available to Address Unique Cardiac Needs

Due to advances in treatment and technology, more patients than ever before who are born with congenital heart disease (CHD) are living into adulthood. For the first time, there are more adult than pediatric CHD patients, with the number of adult cases in the U.S. estimated at 1.3 million.1 The management of these patients is so complex that a new subspecialty of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is now available for certification by the American Board of Medical Specialties. Penn State Hershey Heart and Vascular Institute has long recognized the complex needs of this growing population, and started a program for adult congenital heart disease (PACHD) in 1991, which is directed by William Davidson, Jr., M.D.

Color Doppler image of severe pulmonic insufficiency

Color Doppler image of severe pulmonic insufficiency, commonly found in Tetralogy of
Fallot patients.

Currently, the PACHD has three ACHD providers, all of whom are board certified, having sat for the first-ever ACHD subspecialty boards in October 2015. These specialized clinicians provide 24/7 coverage to all ACHD inpatients, and provide personalized, consistent care to complex patients, most of whom have six to 10 active medical conditions. Problems associated with congenital heart disease include valve disease, heart failure, arrhythmias, aortic and other vascular diseases; pulmonary, renal and liver disease; and a history of multiple surgeries. For example, one of the fastest growing ACHD patient populations have tetralogy of Fallot (ToF).2 This condition requires complex intracardiac “corrective” surgery. A common late consequence is pulmonary valve insufficiency (PI), which can lead to right ventricular dysfunction and sudden death.2 PI is a common lesion in this population that is often missed with conventional testing, according to Dr. Davidson. All ACHD patients require lifelong follow-up and regular visits to an ACHD specialist. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Patient Care, Treatments